Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.library.ui.edu.ng:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/593
Title: RURAL CHANGE AND THE IMPACT OF DEVELOPMENT INTERVENTION ON ILAJE PEOPLE IN ONDO STATE, NIGERIA
Other Titles: A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE INSTITUTE OF AFRICAN STUDIES, IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (ANTHROPOLOGY), UNIVERSITY OF IBADAN
Authors: Ololajulo, B. O.
Keywords: Development intervention
Rural change
Cultural values
Communities
Ilaje people
Issue Date: Jul-2006
Abstract: In Ilaje local government area, development intervention occurred in physical projects like building schools, jetties and footbridges. The prioritization of these projects appeared to have negatively affected the people's cultural attitudes towards self-help, local cooperation and work. This study, therefore, focuses on rural change and development intervention among Ilaje people of Ondo state. These changes have been facilitated by government agencies such as OMPADEC and NDDC through their intervention projects. The study, therefore, explains cultural change in terms of the failure of development intervention to address the problems of subsistence among a people that had their traditional economic modes altered by oil exploitation activities. This is with- a view to determining the appropriateness of current intervention efforts. In order to establish that the oil sector development interventions are the mam sources of change, the study area was purposively sampled along oil producing and non-oil producing communities' segments. This categorization is based on the assumption that dysfunctional changes are rife in oil producing communities, where intervention projects are concentrated. The sampling yielded ten study communities that reflected spatial differentiation. Qualitative data were obtained through focus group discussions, in-depth interviewing of key- informant and participant observation. In addition, the sampling of attitude profile of people was done with thirty respondents selected for interview in each community. These methods so utilized ensured data reliability and validity .Descriptive statistics was employed to analyze the resulting data. The study revealed that the monetary gains of intervention projects were mostly misappropriated by local politicians. This created a class system that disrupted cooperation and community cohesion in oil producing communities. The study also showed that individualism was rife across the study area and was related to stiff competition for economic empowerment in an environment with limited economic opportunities. It was further observed that, enterprise and resourcefulness, though threatened by some outcomes of development intervention, persisted as cherished values across the study area. For the people generally, intervention projects were not reckoned in terms of the sustainability of benefits but on superficial needs. Finally, the study revealed that local participation in projects was tailored towards political gains by agencies. The study concluded that lack of a holistic development approach, which prioritized sustainable livelihood, had negative consequences for the people's culture. The current development undertakings have not only fostered socioeconomic imbalance among the people, they have as well varied extensively the existing social relations. This study recommends an intervention approach that would embrace the productive aspects of rural development.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/593
Appears in Collections:Academic Publications in Institute of African Studies

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