Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.library.ui.edu.ng:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/1219
Title: ASSESSMENT OF SANITARY CONDITIONS OF FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS AND THEIR PATRONAGE IN SELECTED COMMUNITIES IN IBADAN NORTH-WEST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF OYO STATE
Other Titles: A DISSERTATION IN THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY OF PUBLIC HEALTH IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IBADAN
Authors: FATUNMBI, O. M.
Keywords: Food establishments
Sanitary condition
Environmental
Sanitation
Patronage
Issue Date: 2012
Abstract: The current trend to eat outside the home in Nigeria has contributed to increasing number of food establishments where prepared food is sold and consumed. Poor sanitary conditions in such establishments can predispose consumers to food-borne diseases. Although, numerous food establishments exist in Ibadan, an appraisal of their sanitary status has not yet been well documented. This study determined the sanitary status of food establishments and assessed the determinants of their patronage in selected communities in Ibadan North-West Local Government Area (LGA), Oyo State, Nigeria. The study design was cross-sectional. A four-stage random sampling technique was used in selecting 54 out of 108 food establishments in the LGA. Data were collected using four Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) with food handlers, two Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) with staff responsible for food safety at State and LGA levels and an observation of each establishment using a checklist. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain data from 593 consumers selected by systematic random sampling technique. Thematic approach was used for analysing the qualitative data while descriptive and Chi-square statistics were used to analyze the quantitative data. About one-quarter (25.9%) of cooks, 24.1% servers, and 24.1% dish- washers wore apron. Food stains and dirt were observed on clothes of 40.7% cooks, 35.2% servers and 31.4% washers. Sixty-one percent of the establishments had no appropriate refuse bins. The disposal of liquid wastes into partially blocked open drains was observed in 79.6% establishments while 78.4% lacked toilet facilities. Overall 83.3% food establishments had doors without screening nets while the windows of 72.2% had no screening nets. Flies were observed in 81.5% establishments. Separate rooms for storing unprepared foods and dish washing existed in 32.1% and 1.1% of food establishments respectively. A separate hand washing bowl was provided for each customer in 11.1% establishments. Forty-two percent of establishments had napkins but only 28.6% of these were found clean. Food Handlers safety practices were perceived by 67.9% customers to be tolerable. Customer’s patronage choice of food establishments was influenced by cleanliness of food handlers going by the response of 45.5% of the respondents. Availability of electricity was cited as a factor by another 61.9% of the respondents. Respondents’ concerns about eating places include location of sanitary facilities (76.9%) and food preparation from eating area (76.6%) which are significantly associated with education (p<0.05) and gender (p<0.05). The view of most FGD discussants was that financial constraints were the major reason for the inadequate facilities in food establishments. Regular training, routine supervision and imposition of appropriate sanctions were considered necessary by key informants for promoting compliance with safety practices among food handlers. The sanitary status of food establishments in the study area could facilitate the occurrence of food-borne diseases. Yet, sanitary consideration was not a determinant of patronage of the food establishments. Educational intervention aimed at promoting standards of food safety and environmental sanitation is recommended for eliminating the situation.
URI: http://ir.library.ui.edu.ng:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/1219
Appears in Collections:Academic Publications in Public Health

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