Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.library.ui.edu.ng:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/1222
Title: EXPERIENCE AND PERCEIVED MEANS OF PREVENTION OF SEXUAL ABUSE AMONG FEMALE ADOLESCENT HAWKERS IN MARKETS IN IBADAN NORTH EAST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA, IBADAN, NIGERIA
Other Titles: A DISSERTATION IN THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH PROMOTION & EDUCATION SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY OF PUBLIC HEALTH, COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTERS OF PUBLIC HEALTH (HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION) OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IBADAN
Authors: UVERE, E. O.
Keywords: Sexual Abuse
Female Adolescent Hawkers
Help seeking behavior
Issue Date: 2013
Abstract: Involvement of a child or adolescent in a sexual activity is a major cause of reproductive health problem among female children found in vulnerable situations. Most studies on Sexual Abuse (SA) have focused on students in secondary schools, with few targeting people in work places. Having information on the experience of SA among Female Adolescent Hawkers (FAHs) in markets could be used to develop interventions for its amelioration. This study was therefore designed to determine the prevalence and document experiences of SA among FAHs in selected markets in Ibadan North-East Local Government Area (LGA), Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted for the study. Four hundred and ten FAHs aged 10-17 from 6 out of 10 markets in the LGA were purposively selected. Data were collected using a pretested interviewer-administered questionnaire which included questions on respondents’ socio-demographic characteristics, sexual abuse, experiences of SA, help-seeking behaviour and perceived means of preventing SA. In-Depth Interviews (IDIs) were also conducted among seven consenting victims of SA. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square and logistic regression tests were used to analyse the quantitative data with level of significance set at 0.05 while the qualitative data were analysed using thematic approach. Mean age of respondents was 14.4 ± 1.8years.Twenty one percent of respondents have ever had sexual intercourse and of this, 5.4% experienced their first sexual intercourse by rape. Majority (69.0%) of respondents had ever experienced at least one form of SA, of which 68.3% occurred 3 months preceding the study at locations including markets (52.0%), personal home (17.6%), neighbourhood (8.3%), school (8.0%), perpetrators’ residence (5.1%), roadside (4.1%), girl friends’ residence (2.9%), vehicles (0.5%) and party (0.5%). Forms of SA experienced included unwanted touch (48.3%), unwanted sexual comments (30.5%), unwanted kissing (15.6%), exposure to pornographic materials (12.9%), attempted rape (12.4%), genital rubbing (8.3%), exhibitionism (7.8%), rape (5.4%) and voyeurism (3.1%). Respondents who reported an experience of sexual intercourse were less likely (OR = 0.2, 95% CI = 0.0-0.8) while those that had boyfriends were 2.8 times more likely to have ever experienced a form of SA (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.4-5.8). Major perpetrators were male customers (98.6%), traders (98.2%) and peers (69.4%). Majority (67.5%) who had experienced SA within the last 3 months preceding the study did not disclose or seek help. The IDI revealed that avoiding being blamed and perceiving disclosure of experience as unnecessary were the reasons for not seeking help. Avoiding unnecessary discussion with males, administration of appropriate punishment by government on perpetrators and hawking in groups were perceived means through which SA could be prevented. Sexual abuse occurred among female adolescent hawkers mostly in markets. Its victims did not seek help majorly due to social challenges. To prevent sexual abuse, age-appropriate sexuality education and life building skills should be targeted at female adolescent hawkers while advocacy is needed for caregivers and market stakeholders.
URI: http://ir.library.ui.edu.ng:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/1222
Appears in Collections:Academic Publications in Public Health

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.